ACCESS OF THE MUNICIPALITY CLEANING WORKERS TO LIVELIHOOD ESSENTIALS AND THE RELATIONSHIP DISCOMFITURE WITH MAINSTREAM POPULATION: A STUDY OF GOPALGANJ TOWN

Tulika Podder1, Shamima Nasreen2, Shammy Islam3, Dr. M. Zulfiquar Ali Islam4

ACCESS OF THE MUNICIPALITY CLEANING WORKERS TO LIVELIHOOD ESSENTIALS AND THE RELATIONSHIP DISCOMFITURE WITH MAINSTREAM POPULATION: A STUDY OF GOPALGANJ TOWN

Tulika Podder1, Shamima Nasreen2, Shammy Islam3, Dr. M. Zulfiquar Ali Islam4

1 Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University, Gopalganj-8100, +88 01884868016, tulikapodder02gmail.com

2 Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University, Gopalganj-8100, +88 01720329976, snm.mily@gmail.com

3Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Begum Rokeya University, Rangpur, +88 01744574904, shammyislam99999@gmail.com

4Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, +88 01715359715, drzulfiquarai@gmail.com

 

A R T I C L E  I N F O

Article Type: Review

Received: 02, Oct. 2023.

Accepted: 03, Dec. 2023.

Published: 12, Dec. 2023.

 

 

A B S T R A C T

The present paper primarily focuses on the access of the municipality cleaning workers to livelihood essentials and the relationship discomfiture with mainstream population at Gopalganj Town. Waste workers protect the environment by making materials available for reuse or to be reprocessed and enabling valuable materials to go back into the global recycling stream. This paper is very constructive in sorting out the major dimensions of livelihood conditions and the social networking status of municipality cleaning workers as minority group in this locality and also enthusiastically tries to reveal the dominant causes of why they are belonging to deprived and underprivileged sections of the society and are subjected to acquire inadequate paid livelihoods essentials and legal privileges. Concurrently, this study is wedded to analyze their social exclusion from other social groups because of living in an isolated area and belonging to schedule segment of population. The present study is primarily based on empirical data gathered through survey methods, direct interviewing with the purposively chosen municipality cleaning workers of Gopalganj Town, case studies, FGDs, observation and informal interviews with stakeholders. Both the qualitative and quantitative interpretation of social reality is considered to be reciprocally focused here. Based on the findings, a number of suggestive policy measures with strong networking to eradicate discomfiture relationship and cultural barriers that the planners and implementers may consider for the future development of cleaning workers’ livelihood conditions and to create stimulating socio-cultural and legal milieu of proper networking with mainstream population in Bangladesh society are embedded in end of the paper.

Keywords:

Cleaning workers, Livelihood, Livelihood essentials, Discomfiture, Mainstream population.

 

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